Wudangshan Taijiquan

This is a traditional form that is suggested for improving balance, focus and meditative aspects.  It is taught one posture at a time, at the student's pace, with an intensive focus on fundamentals in movement.  Wudangshan is a starting point for anyone interested in the art of taijiquan.

Wudangshan taijiquan is the predominate taiji form taught by LaoMa.  It is a long empty hand form which the same posture list as the commonly taught Yang style however each posture generally contains a few more movement or applications.  The form has 108 postures and, when performed in its entirety, takes 45 minutes to complete.  Students usually learn the form in roughly 2 years but are able to start benefiting from the practice of the form after a month or so, as principles of movement are ingrained.

Classes in this form are offered in Durham, Raleigh, Bynum, and Pittsboro.  This includes Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday night classes as well as a Thursday morning class.  Workshops in wudangshan taijiquan are also offered on some Saturdays.  Please see our class schedule for more detailed information.

Liuhebafa

A rare and powerful art that combines strengths of three internal martial arts: the straightforward, compact delivery of Xingi, the agile, circular dynamics of Bagua, and the smooth, relaxed execution of Taijiquan, and a fourth element consisting of unusual undulating, wave-like movement that gives the style the name “Water Boxing.”

Liuhebafa is characterized by a dramatic rising and falling.  Once learned, the form moves a bit faster and can provide a more athletic contrast to some of the traditional taiji forms.  It builds leg strength, balance and agility at the same time it helps a practitioner unify the body and mind.

A class is this form is offered on Wednesday nights in Durham.  A student can also learn this during the 4th Saturday Seminar. Please see our class schedule for more information.

Tangquan

Tangquan is a traditionally hard style martial art form and includes a number of punches, kicks,  and jumps.  While it is a hard style empty hand form, tangquan is taught from an internal eye and can be used to explore some faster techniques and explosive energy.  This form is typically taught during the Wednesday night weapons class, at the 4th Saturday Seminar or upon special request. 

A popular form in China, though rare here, devised by the first Tang emperor's 3rd son in the 7th century, Tangquan is characterized by vigorous expression, fluid changes, and alacrity. LaoMa's teacher learned Tangquan in 1911, and in 1980 won a gold medal with it in open competition at the All-China Wushu Championships.

A class is this form is offered on Wednesday nights in Durham.  A student can also learn this during the 4th Saturday Seminar. Please see our class schedule for more information.