It's all in the hands

Chen Zijiang is performing a 5 star routine here; a perfect, seamless flow of Fundamentals, Form, and Function!


Watch the hands. As a great teacher imparted a way long time ago, when I was too young and dense to understand, “watch the hands, they come from below, they tell the whole story, between the visable and invisable opponent.”

Sifu vs. Sifu

Below is a screen shot of a recent post on Facebook by Dug Corpolongo.  This is a very good post of thoughts and comments on this topic, but Dug leaves an important fact out completely.

After reading it over, can you think back to various information shared in classes and seminars that might have been left out - or perhaps help explain some of the confusion around this term and it's use?

Sifu vs Sifu.JPG

Taking it apart to put it back together again

(In order to see how it really works)

Woody taiji

This would be my first time in writing for the student corner but I very much wanted to report my experience interacting with the abbreviated form composed of only three postures and the transitions among them. Dubbed the “Roller Coaster” form (it perhaps deserves a more elegant name?) is made from combining only the Grasp Sparrows Tail/Single Whip, Deflect, Parry and Punch, and Hug the Knee postures.

I had ‘learned’ the Wudang Mountain 108 form by progressing through the series of 152 postures at a measured pace. It took me more or less two years to work through all six sections and reach the point where I could complete the Form without following anyone. It was a work of memory and attention just to be able to finish the Form without finding myself lost for moments. That was a challenge and still LaoMa said -more than once! – “Now you know the choreography and you can begin to learn the Form.”  I took that to mean I would need to develop some mastery of the individual postures and in that way continue to learn the Form. The Form, by definition, is a series of postures ordered not in an arbitrary manner, but in a securely fixed and intentional sequence.
   
I’ve always admired how exceptional teachers are able to help students by continuously changing and constantly adapting their methods, viewing the subject from different angles, repeating many times what needs to be repeated, often surprising the students in various ways to awaken them.

Woody group taichi

Observing the capabilities and progress of each student, great teachers don’t teach out of books. I’ve watched LaoMa for many years now as he teaches with persistence, imagination and saintly patience. How many times might he have asked: “What posture is done only in the first section and never repeats? “, or “How many hug the knees in the whole form?” Responses range from blank stares, lucky guesses and, sometimes, a correct answer. The teacher-a telephone ringing in an empty room.

What does it take to awaken a senior student who himself recognizes he has become a little bored with the Form, just interested enough to show up regularly and maybe practice once in a while? Is a breakthrough even possible for her?

I write this because I feel I’ve made a genuine breakthrough in my practice after years of stasis and often regression. And I came to this through our recent work with the Roller Coaster Form.

So how did this happen for me? The development seemed to begin innocently enough with a detail review and corrections of a single posture DPP, while also noting where it was repeated in the Form. This exercise seemed to lead quite naturally, although unexpectedly, to the creation of the Roller Coaster. That experience of developing the abbreviated form (which is really not at all abbreviated as the missing parts are just not physically expressed) led me to a personal breakthrough. For the first time I began to see/feel/understand the Form not just as a memorized sequence of postures but as “The Form”, a whole greater than its parts-the gestalt. It’s difficult for me to describe this insight except to say I began to perceive the Form as a sort of landscape rather than a linear chain of postures.

Cold Front.jpg

I’ve begun to practice daily for the first time in many years. And enjoying all the benefits of frequent practice. It’s hard to identify what it was in my experience with Roller Coaster that so captured my renewed attention. It could have been the very process of disassembly and reconstruction through which I began to see how the Form “works”. I needed to think about the Form as a whole as we worked together on Thursday mornings in the development of the Roller Coaster. That attention was sustained as we then aimed to restore the entire Form to its original whole.

I write this filled with appreciation and gratitude to LaoMa for his extraordinary ability to wake up an oversleeping student.

By Woody Lomas, 7/2018

Raises in Ranks!

Amelia Marlowe 2.jpg

We are happy to announce that a couple close members of our family have raised their ranks recently!!

Many of you know our classmate Dan Marlowe from Form and Push-Hands classes.  His wonderful wife Angela helped raise his rank to DAD! On Thursday, May 17th at 11:14pm, Amelia Grace Marlowe decided to “grace” them with her presence - a wee bit earlier than planned.  As of June 7th Amelia was up to 3 lbs and 9 oz!  Our thoughts are with the three of them.  Dan says she's feisty - and we love feisty ladies around here!!

 

And some of you may know LaoMa's granddaughter Stephenie gave him a bump up to Great Grand Daddy!!!  Kenneth The III weighs in 9lbs and 13oz.  Welcome to the family!

Great Grandbaby 2.jpg
Great Grandbaby.JPG

Taiji vs Tai Chi Conversation on Facebook

If you've talked to anyone about your taijiquan practice and used the term "taiji", you might have gotten confused looks.  When you say "Tai Chi" your conversation partner's face clears up and they suddenly know that you're talking about old people waving their arms around in parks!  This confusion happens more frequently when sending emails, texts - and especially on one of our most popular venues - Facebook!! 

This cross communication happens because there are two Chinese transliteration systems - Wade Giles and pinyin.  The Wade Giles system was the original system and many Americans learned to recognize Chinese words and concepts through that system.  In later year, pinyin has taken it's place and is now the preferred system.  

Below is a cut and paste of a recent conversation on The Facebook.  I've taken screen shots for those not able to enjoy these kinds of debates because of lack of access.  It is also possible that this link might take you to this thread.   

We can cover this ground more in depth in classes but it would be educational for you to glance over the comment thread below.  You'll see an extended explanation from LaoMa within this thread.

Take a second an leave your thoughts on this debate in the comments section below.

chi vs ji
chi vs ji 2
chi vs ji see more.JPG
chi vs ji 2.JPG
chi vs ji insert 1.JPG
chi vs ji insert 2.JPG
chi vs ji 4.JPG
chi vs ji 5.JPG
chi vs ji 6.JPG
chi vs ji 7.JPG
chi vs ji 8.JPG
chi vs ji 9.JPG

Feedback

Below is an excerpt of a letter from a long distance senior student sister.  This is in the context of responding to an older post on Student Corner: The devil's in the details.  This post involved Wing Chun hand positions.  You can view it by clicking here for a refresher.

Debra_LaoMa.jpg

This student studies with other teachers in her area. 


Sometimes it can be challenging to reconcile two different systems.  Recently, I was told to try to just move my hand rather than to move my body to execute a certain drill.  The point of the drill, I think, was to experiment with certain rotations of the hands, which are useful for seeing the spiraling movements, but I am always trying to have the body make the hand move, remembering Master Jou saying, "Arms have no movement," in the last workshop I attended with him and your principle of whole-body movement.

Probably because I have finally broken though in the movement of the hip joints, I think, I am especially focused on this.  Two things, in particular, have come out of my working on this:  I understand now why you told me that I need to be 80/20 in Roll Back rather than going to 100/0 and what being 50/50 in Cloud Hands means.  In one of the taiji books I read, there was an anecdote about Cheng Man-ching standing in front of his desk and moving; not wanting to interrupt him, the person who told this anecdote waited for a while then finally interrupted him and asked what he was doing.  The name he gave was Constant Bear, and Cheng said that it was all you need for taiji practice. 

I believe that movement was what we call Bear Swings through the Woods (and Wags Its Tail).  I first began to work on this in the cane form when I found it difficult to move from one posture to the next in some places because I had weight on the foot I needed to pick up, and through some experimentation and a return to the Four Flowers, I began to see what I was doing wrong.  I am still working on this, of course, but I'm starting to have the sensation of riding a wave when things are going well!

Dissecting the form: Student Analysis and Guides

Over the course of a long empty hand form, there are a few groupings of postures that are repeated.  These postures combine together to make up a significant part of our form.  Given the repetition of these postures, one might infer that they are particularly important to the practice of taijiquan and special attention should be paid to them.

Over the last few months, classes have expanded on this theme and begun to include short forms that are comprised of only repeated postures.  For example, one form may include all of the Hug Knee postures in sequential order but no other postures from the form.  Or perhaps, all of the Grasp Sparrow's Tails/Single Whip sequences can be strung together to provide a complete picture of all of the occurrences of this sequence, providing a short form and a way to compare variations through the form.

taichi Support.jpg

Working with the form in this way can give a practitioner a clearer picture of the structure of the form.  Think of the form as a building.  Perhaps the most often repeated sequence can be seen as the support posts for the entire structure - something the artist returns to over and over as the base of their form - Grasp Sparrow's Tail/Single whip for example..  From there, the form contains other frequently repeated postures like Deflect, Parry and Punch or Hug Knee.  These can be seen as the joists or beams that tie the substantial posts together, helping to create a cohesive structure.  As other postures are added in, the structure of form begins to take full form, a structure complete with all the trimmings (think complicated postures that appear once in the form).  

As our classes have worked with this concept, one of our students has created a helpful guide to the Deflect, Parry and Punch posture, which is repeated a total of six times.  It's important to know how the repetitions are similar and in what ways they differ.  

Gary taiji Study Guide.JPG

Here you can see Gary Forbach's personal chart to track these differences.  While it's helpful for every student to figure out their own way to track differences in the form, this is a helpful guide to all and can provide a good starting point for anyone wishing to do their own analysis of the form.  

 
Bob taiji Guide.JPG

The second document here is another take on how documentation used to explore the form.  This is a study guide to the form compiled by another student, Bob Ingram.  This guide breaks the form into groupings using colors and other notations.  It's a one stop shop!

Do you have a way you explore the form on paper?  Have you created cheat sheets of your own? What other types of things may be helpful in deepening your understanding of form?  Leave your thoughts and comments below.

#BlackBambooP

Taiji Daily Handy Helpers

As we mention continuously, taiji is based on principles of movements and is not tied to a specific set of movements.  Any activity done using taiji principles can be taiji practice!!  

One of my favorite things is finding the places that taiji principles creep into my daily life or the places where taiji practice can make things easier.

A fellow student, Gary Forbach, ran across the blurb below in an AARP magazine recently and sent it our way.  We thought we'd share it and ask for other places you all might use taiji to keep yourselves safe from injury, as well as the spots that you find taiji enhancing your daily life.

A couple that pop up into my mind are below the image.  Share yours in the comments!

Daily Taiji
  • Opening a public door:  Have you ever had someone pull a door at the exact time you push - only to have both of you topple over and scare each other?  Taiji pulls and pushes are completed whole body and are not executed by leaning into or away from someone. 
  • Pushing a car:  A classic example of how we can draw energy up through the ground, direct it through the waste and send it right into the back of that car to get it moving!
  • Holding a toddler:  The sticking and reading that we practice in push hands, combined with a light touch, can be very useful when holding a squirming toddler.  You don't want them to feel trapped but you can't let them get away either!
  • Relaxing and deep breathing in trying situations:  While this may be something push hands players experience more than form practitioners, there is something to be said for learning how to be relaxed and breath while someone is being slightly aggressive in your direction.

Grasp Sparrow's Tail Posture Instructions Updated

taichi_durham_singlewhip

“Grasp Sparrow Tail” (Lan Que Wei) is a sequence of postures that recurs 8 times total during the entire 154 posture, Wudangshan 108 Taijiquan Form, the most repeated sequence of any group of postures in this Form.  It is comprised of 4 separate postures:  Ward Off, Rollback, Press and Push (Peng, Lu, Ji, An), or 4 of the all-important 8 Gates above the waist, making this sequence even more important for students to understand.  Cross Hands (Shi Zi Shou) is repeated 3 times, and Close (He Taiji) bring the Form to its final posture.  In total this entire sequence of 39 repeated postures comprises one fourth of all the postures of Wudangshan 108 Taijiquan; a number that fits with most of the popular “short” Forms developed in Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. 

Many of you referred to our written instructions during your early days of learning form or snuck a peak once in a while to remember exactly what you do on which counts!

LaoMa has worked tirelessly and updated these instructions.  The new and improved version is available on the website in the Class Info tab - under Class Documents.  

Take a moment to review this new edition of instructions.  It is clear and concise as well as up to date on new counts for the postures.

tai chi_chapel Hill

You may note that Single Whip is missing from this instruction set.  Keep an eye out for the new and improved instruction set for Single Whip and Cross Hands that will be coming out soon!  No need to wait in line - we'll post the new version online for your convenience!! 

Earth Ox Pottery Unveiling!

20170127_150800.jpg

Many of you know Selden Lamoureux as one of our favorite classmates and long suffering (hee hee) wife of LaoMa!  And, while we happily extend her many thanks for keeping out master alive and well, many of you may not know her true superpower!

Selden is an exceptionally talented potter!  Over the years, I've been blessed to add several of her pieces to my kitchen and life.  Each time I use them, they give me so much joy that I had to spread her well kept secret!  

NC Pottery Pitchers

Earth Ox Pottery now has a website (https://www.seldenpottery.com/) that showcases her many creations. Take a gander at it; the holiday season is fast approaching and special handmade pottery is useful and functional! You can also link to her website from our navigation menu at the top of the page.

fermentation crock pottery

(Warning... Violet gushing follows - to avoid just go look at pretty pictures on her website!  To see her stuff in person, see the dates below or just talk to her next time you're out at the pavilion... or email her... she is part of the new digital age now).

It's small pleasures that make our daily tasks feel like celebrations of life, friends and allow us to meditate on the joy around us.  Her work reminds me of our shared labors of love and our common desire to have even our "menial" tasks bring smiles to our faces.  

Some of you may know about her bread bakers.  They are beautiful and come with a fool proof artisan bread recipe!  I've used it many mornings with guests because it's about the easiest (and most impressive) thing to do while drinking coffee!  Plus, it's super easy to vary, adding rye, oatmeal or whole wheat depending on the mood!

nesting mixing bowls

My latest love is a set of nesting bowls she's created.  They have a clever handle, spout and lip that feel sooo well balanced in the hand.  They're perfect for making and pouring pancakes or fritters, and I LOVE to see the color emerge again when they're all clean and shiny!  When I got a set, I just left them on my counter for a couple days to admire them!!

She (or her work) will be appearing in the following locations (as well as on her website):

Pittsboro Street Fair this Saturday, October 28th, from 10:00 - 5:00 in downtown Pittsboro

Duke Holiday Arts Invitational: During the holiday season, Duke Arts & Health curates a Holiday Arts & Craft Invitational within the Arts & Health Galleries located in the Concourse between Duke Hospital North and the Duke Medicine Pavilion. Our goal for this invitational is to highlight works by talented local and regional craftsmen and artists, and to offer staff, patients and families an opportunity to enjoy a delightful exhibit and ultimately purchase unique, quality items at relatively affordable prices during the holiday season.
Website: https://artsandhealth.duke.edu/

Facebook: @ArtsHealthAtDuke

On the Cat Walk

Shifu Rose Oliver of Double Dragon Alliance Center, Shanghai, China, modeling, front and back, our Black Bamboo Pavilion t-shirt.

Rose Shifu conducts workshops sponsored by Magic Tortoise Taijiquan School, at several of DrJay's longtime students' schools along our east coast, as well as here in Durham-Chapel Hill.

Rose_Tshirt_Front.JPG
Rose_Tshirt.JPG

Two Fishes: Poetry and Taijiquan

Many of us have very personal experiences for how the practice of taijiquan has impacted our daily lives.  There are many connecting threads between practicing the art and the many other facets of our lives.  The longer we practice, the more tightly these bonds weave and the more we are able to identify and appreciate the impact of taijiquan on daily life and daily life's impact on our practice of taijiquan.

Debra_LaoMa.jpg

Because taijiquan is such a solitary practice, we very seldom hear about this personal journey from our fellow classmates, teachers, and peers.  However, sharing these impacts and perceptions strengthens us all, allowing us to experience our art form and our daily lives in new ways through new eyes.

Below is an exceptional example of this type of exploration.  The gift of this essay exploring a very intimate internal experience of two areas coming together in a life deserves great consideration.  Not only will it allow you to hear about another practitioner's experience of the art form - it will allow likely awake in you those areas in your own life where you feel the fingers of taijiquan tickling on a regular basis.   

Thanks to our resident poet, Debra Kang Dean, for allowing us to share this with you.  And for giving us a glimpse into her personal practice and experience of taijiquan!

Two Fishes

by

Debra Kang Dean

Between 1997 and 1999, I undertook intensive study in Wudangshan 108, a taiji form, with Almanzo “LaoMa” Lamoureux of the Magic Tortoise Taijiquan School, commuting over a hundred miles each way from Greenville to Chapel Hill for eighteen months—first one, then two, then three times a week—and, after I had moved to Massachusetts, making periodic week-long visits to North Carolina. I had been writing poetry in earnest for ten years, and though I was exercising regularly before I began practicing taiji, I could not shake off the feeling that I was becoming a sort of “talking head,” a creature of language only, and that I was losing my connection with what had been the source of my poetry—in other words, the left brain activity seemed to have subdued the right brain and was making me a little crazy.

Wudangshan 108 is both complex and beautiful, and these are the qualities that drew me to it the first time I saw it performed. I knew only that I wanted to learn and be able to do the form well, and I was fortunate that my late husband encouraged me to pursue it. Soon, in addition to attending classes and practicing, however, I was also reading books in an effort to understand Daoism and the principles underlying taiji movement. This full-immersion style had also characterized my ten-year engagement in poetry, and I confess there was a time when, though I was still writing, I had considered redirecting all of my energies to taiji. As fate would have it, however, within a two-week period in 1997, my chapbook manuscript won the Harperprints Poetry Chapbook Competition, and the editors at BOA Editions selected for publication the book-length manuscript I had been working on for seven years after receiving my MFA degree. I felt, in part, that I was being called back to poetry.

In 1999, I traveled to Missoula, Montana, to interview the late Patricia Goedicke, one of my poetry teachers. While I was her student and even much later, she repeatedly encouraged me to open up to the larger, Whitmanesque sweeps of language in my poetry. On that visit, however, when I came inside after practicing taiji in her back yard, she said, “Now I understand.” Unbeknownst to me, she had watched me practice, and she said that it looked as if I were making boundaries visible as I moved through the postures. I love this image because it reflects the way I think about writing poetry, too. While several of the taiji teachers I’ve worked with resist the idea of postures and substitute the word “movements” to emphasize the flow from one posture into another, I think of the brief pauses marking the postures as being like the place one has learned a line should break, and it takes practice to tune the inner ear to know such points of balance; as with poetry, that place determines the meeting ground of strength and weakness, of risk and expressiveness.

Many of the corrections a taiji teacher makes are attempts to impart a vision of the form as a whole and an occasion for students to learn without judgment what their limitations are—both of body and of mind—at that particular moment in their development. In taiji, one’s medium is the body, and form marks out a place for exploration and discovery. So for me taiji is not only an art of transcendence but also of immanence, which is precisely why I love it so much. Here one comes face to face with the miracle of the incarnation. How is it we come to inhabit these bodies? Over the course of my engagement with taiji, I have known myself as being in but not entirely of the body only a few times, and such experiences leave traces even in an often skeptical consciousness like mine.

Needless to say, I do not wish to be “out of nature” as Yeats used the phrase in “Sailing to Byzantium”; rather, I wish to know the “dying animal” I am “fastened to” in order to go deeper into it—because it, too, is part of nature. Poetry and taiji help me to do this—poetry through motion in apparent stillness and taiji through stillness in apparent motion. In poetry, the body expresses itself through the mind, and in taiji the mind expresses itself through the body. Body and mind—these are my two fishes, another name for the yin-yang symbol, and it’s interesting to consider that a fish must move to breathe and so to live. With sight, where the two fields of vision overlap, we perceive depth; whatever it is I know as spirit is like that.

For a long time I thought I was drawn to taiji rather than zazen or yoga because I had been an athlete in my youth, that my body still craved motion, which is a partial truth. I have found that on the physical level, practicing a long form that has been engrammed can be almost as pleasurable as a five-mile run. At higher levels of practice, however, taiji, sometimes called “shadow boxing,” also requires using the imagination to bring to life a carefully choreographed set of movements known “by heart.” It’s said that a good practitioner will so shape the patterns of movement that an imagined other becomes visible to those who have studied taiji, and those who have not can sometimes recognize when a practitioner has put his or her whole self—body, mind, and spirit—into the effort by the seemingly effortless quality of movement.

Nearly fifteen years after starting to learn Wudangshan 108, I have come to believe that the solitary aspects of the practice of taiji and of poetry are different but complementary modes of meditation, one wordless and the other full of words, that regulate threads of connection, including the inhalations and exhalations of breath. In taiji we speak of silk-reeling energy, and in poetry the unit of attention or energy is the line, a word that can be traced etymologically to flax and, when it enters Old English, means “string, row, [or] series.”

In private lessons during my period of intense training in North Carolina, my teacher would often focus on one section of the form and then offer what sometimes seemed like a non-stop series of corrections, which I never found discouraging. Sometimes it was challenging, of course; however, because it was not simply a matter of changing the position of my hand, say, but of understanding it as a problem that might originate in my feet, I had to find my own way there. LaoMa told me on several occasions during these lessons that he wanted me to learn the form as taught to him by his teacher. By this means of transmission, taiji became for me more than exercise or just beautiful movement because, however imperfectly I might be performing it, I was learning to embody a form and becoming part of a human chain that went back to Zhang Sanfeng, who is generally credited with creating this art and to whom my teacher’s teacher traced Wudangshan 108. So I have come to see this form as a “songline.”

When I practice Wudangshan 108, then, even if just a small part of it, how can I feel alone? I am no longer strictly in the present but have, instead, brought something from the past into it. And yet, as if it were an inevitable outgrowth of Daoist thought, my teacher also told me that after I mastered the form—he is such an optimist!—I would almost be obliged to put my signature on it, which I think is not about originality but about engaging with the form in the light of the present, of which I am a part; in other words, I am to be not just a place holder but a meeting ground where what is essential in the form is carried into the future so that the line may remain unbroken. This requires learning from the wisdom of the body what is substantial and insubstantial at any given moment and how, because movement is change, one becomes the other for as long as this beautiful wave of postures lasts.

Surely the journey to mastery of such forms lasts as long as life does and may suffer many interruptions, as mine certainly has. It is so strange to be writing in anticipation of a visit to work with LaoMa later this summer. Though I have mostly kept a hand in taiji, in terms of time, I feel a little like a prodigal returning after a long absence. I know that in one respect, these are the sort of journeys that end only with death; in conventional terms, Dīng Hóngkuí, my teacher’s teacher, Patricia Goedicke, one of my poetry teachers, and Bradley P. Dean, my husband, are insubstantial now. And yet, for a moment, here they are, present.

When I do the whole of Wudangshan 108, I want to make my way and make visible my passage through a meeting ground that is also always precisely here. Writing poetry, I try to remember that the Chinese word for poetry is a composite of one character meaning both “word” and “speech,” and another meaning “temple”; I want to call into being that temple, whose true medium, beneath the words, is breath. Obviously, I don’t live on this plane; mostly, I just keep breathing. Because of those who came before me and left their marks, however, I can imagine it and try to keep moving, as best I can, with the hope that at some point, I will find myself standing on the threshold.

 

 

                                                                                                                                          July 2012

More support for Tai Chi

Obviously, we don't need yet another reason to practice Taijiquan!  But it's nice to be backed up on the "it's just plain good for you" idea! 

Durham T'ai chi classes

Thanks to Gary Forbach, who sent this article our way.

Tai Chi May Help Prevent Falls

Practicing tai chi helps older people improve their balance and avoid falls, a review of studies has found.

Tai chi is a form of Chinese martial arts now practiced as exercise. It involves a specific program of graceful movements, accompanied by deep breathing and mental focus, that slowly move the center of balance from one leg to the other.

Researchers found 10 randomized trials analyzing the effect of tai chi on the incidence of falls or the time until an elderly person first has a fall. All studies compared tai chi to usual care or other treatments like physical therapy, stretching or exercise.

Stances! Trivia time

To quote LaoMa: BASIC, FUNDAMENTAL BUILDING BLOCK OF FORM!

Quiz time - how many of these can you name?  Can you name them in Chinese and English?  

Better yet - how many do you practice and do you know how to 'measure' them or make sure your feet are in the right spots?

Prove your vast knowledge - click on comments :-)

Bonus question:  Which one does LaoMa use in stance drill that isn't shown here.

Raise in Rank - Desiree Goldman

red sash ceremony Desiree Goldman

We are so happy to have Desiree join our group of Senior Students!  

Desiree started studying with LaoMa several years ago.  She knew herself well enough to tuck the knowledge and skills of taiji in her back pocket and focus on her hard style martial arts study.  After a few years putting the smack down on others, Desiree returned to our small group in November 2013 and continued her taijiquan studies.

tai chi push Desiree Goldman

On May 15th, 2017, she successfully tested in her regular Monday night class in Durham for her Senior Sash!  The entire form was well executed and all in order!  As we all know, her true study begins now.  

This is just the start of the really fun part of taijiquan and we are happy to have Desiree join our ranks with her knowledge and focus!

Congratulations Desiree Goldman!

taiji red sash award Desiree Goldman

MMA vs. Taiji Master?

For those of you not on Facebook or without a feed full of taiji videos, this short video has been making the rounds.  It's very short - 10 second fight!  

"A (short) video has gone viral on Chinese social media today showing a "fight" between a mixed martial artist and a Tai Chi "master." (http://shanghaiist.com/2017/04/28/mma-vs-tai-chi.php)

Take a moment and share your thoughts through the comments link below.